Meaning of honrar a camisa, sair vazado and colírio para os olhos

Learn the meaning of honrar a camisa, sair vazado and colírio para os olhos

Meaning of honrar a camisa, sair vazado and colírio para os olhos

Hello there and welcome to our Portuguese Basic Tips 70 (in English) called Meaning of honrar a camisa, sair vazado and colírio para os olhos

On today’s podcast, we are going to learn 3 more new expressions in Portuguese.  This time we’re going to learn the meaning of “honrar a camisa”, “sair vazado” and “colírio para os olhos”. Let’s get started!

Visit our previous podcast called Increasing Brazilian Portuguese vocabulary

Honrar a camisa

I don’t know if you know but Brazil is a well-known country because of the Brazilian soccer team, which means that people here like soccer very much!

In the old days, a soccer player used to spend his whole life by playing for just one team. For instance, Pelé played for decades in Santos Futebol Clube, Zico did the same in Flamengo and so forth.

When that happens we say that the player “honrou a camisa” – he honored his shirt! That means the player struggles to win all matches he can! He respects the team he represents.

It turns out that the expression started to be used in daily conversation.  For instance:

–              Se eu conseguir esse emprego, vou honrar a camisa! (If I can get this job, I’ll do my best).

–              Ele honrou a camisa para aprender português (He did his best to learn Portuguese)

Sair vazado

This is a very informal one. We’re just going to speak about it, because you need to know the meaning of “sair vazado”, just in case you hear that some place over here.

Sair vazado simply means “to leave”, however this is mostly used by teenagers. Sometimes they use this expression meaning “to run away” or to avoid someone’s company. For instance:

–              Vou sair vazado, antes que sua amiga chata venha. (I’m leaving now, before your annoying friend come)

–              Vou sair vazado antes que a polícia venha (I’m running away, before the police officers come).

Colírio para os olhos

The last expression we’re going to learn today is “colírio para os olhos”. Using this expression is the same as “music to my ears” or, in Portuguese, “música para os meus ouvidos”. See: colírio is the same as “eye drops” in Portuguese. So, literally we got “eye drops to my eyes”. We use it when we want to mean this is a “pleasant situation”, we are comfortable with that.

For instance:

–              Ver você todas as manhãs é um colírio para os meus olhos.  (Seeing you every morning is a sight for sore eyes)

–              Esse quadro é um colírio para os meus olhos (This painting is a sight for sore eyes).

That’s enough for today.

I hope you like it!

Become a Premium Member and download our full transcripts!

Click on the link to visit a Portuguese slang dictionary

See you next time.

Thanks!

Marcos Sales

 

You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *